VARIOUS WAYS TO MOVE INTO AN OPPONENT

By the courtesy of Ogingo Videography, Sabah, Malaysia.

Shaolin Kungfu Show in Sabah

Grandmaster Wong demonstrating the "Shoot-Step" during the Sabah Intensive Shaolin Kungfu Course

Moving into an opponent effectively requires suitable techniques and appropriate skills. More importantly, you have to ensure you are safe from his counter-attacks.

If all things were equal, the responder has an advantage over the initiator in an encounter. In the process of your attack, as you move in and before you have stabilized yourself is the moment when you are vulnerable to an opponent's counter-attack. For example, as your front foot reaches the ground and you are about to thrust out a punch, if your opponent's snake palm is coming at your eyes or throat, or his kick coming at your ribs, it is not easy to defend against his surprised counters if you are not prepared and trained to do so.

Reversely, if an opponent rushes in to attack you, it is relatively easy for you to strike him in surprise, especially if he is not trained in the principle of “safety first” and thus exposes himself carelessly. Please see Surprise your Attacker with a Counter-Attack .

But not all things are equal. Hence, if you understand and practice combat principles, you can have advantages when you initiate an attack. One important aspect is how to move in safely and effectively. The video clips below show some of the ways how you can realize these advantages

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The Importance of Footwork

Shaolin Kungfu Show in Sabah

Grandmaster Wong highlights a common mistake some students make especially in Combat Sequences 1 to 4. They do not move their front leg sufficiently from Bow-Arrow to False-Leg or vice versa. The False-Leg Stance is about half the space of the Bow-Arrow Stance, and the gap should be maintained as such, otherwise the tactics of “shallow” and “shoot” will not be effective. Grandmaster Wong also highlights the importance of rotating the waist.

The size of the video clip is 1.93 MB.

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Moving into Attack with Correct Spacing

Shaolin Kungfu Show in Sabah

Grandmaster Wong leads the class in the practice of correct spacing when moving in to attack. Shown here are moving one step and moving one and a half steps. Asking the way is essential. It is one of the secrets that ensure “safety first”. Notice that the “Black Tiger” is executed by rotating the waist with internal force issuing from the dan tian and exploding in the punch. This is another secret, and it concerns internal force. In other words, those who do not know about asking the way, and rotating their waist correct, would expose themselves to risky counter-attacks and would be unable to explode internal force effectively.

The size of the video clip is 1.63 MB.

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Left-Leg Mode to Left-Leg Mode

Shaolin Kungfu Show in Sabah

Grandmaster Wong shows how you could move into an opponent to attack him if he is about two steps away. Here the movement is from left-leg mode to left-leg mode. In other words, you start with your left leg in front, and end also with your left leg in front, though you have changed from a False-Leg Stance to a Bow-Arrow Stance. Another mode would be used if, for some technical considerations, you wish to have your right leg in front.

The size of the video clip is 0.98 MB.

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The Shoot Step

Shaolin Kungfu Show in Sabah

Grandmaster Wong shows the “Shoot Step”, or “Phiew Pou” (Cantonese) in Chinese. This is a suitable mode to use to attack an opponent if he is about two and a half steps away. Notice that here it involves three different stances, namely False-Leg, Unicorn and Bow-Arrow, but is performed in one smooth movement. If an opponent wishes to bounce away, he would need two to three movements to cover the same space. This means that if one second is needed to make one movement, you would have put your opponent in an awkward position when you attack, because in one second he has only retreated one space whereas you would be right in front pressing an attack on him.

The size of the video clip is 0.91 MB.

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The Three-Step Shoot

Shaolin Kungfu Show in Sabah

If your opponent is further away, or if you wish to press in further, you can use a three-step shoot shown here, instead of the two-step shoot shown in the previous video clip. In the three-step shoot, you start by moving your front leg from False-Leg to Bow-Arrow, whereas in the two-step shoot you start by moving your back leg from False-leg to Unicorn. Re reminded that you should ask the way and rotate your waist as your punch out a “Black Tiger”.

The size of the video clip is 0.84 MB.

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Shoot and Roll in Four-Step Attack

Shaolin Kungfu Show in Sabah

Grandmaster Wong illustrates various ways of moving in to attack depending on how far away your opponent is. If he is four steps away, you could use a three-step shoot plus a roll-step. These two movements — shoot and roll — should be performed as one smooth movement. Notice that the movement is from left-leg mode to left-leg mode.

The size of the video clip is 0.84 MB.

Click here to download.

We wish to thank Mr Godfery Kissey of Ogingo Videography, Penampang, Sabah, Malaysia for kindly provideing us with the videos. (Godfery is also a member of our Shaolin Wahnam Family.) His telephone number is 60-88-731788, and e-mail address is godfery@pc.jaring.my .


You can view all the videos here

LINKS

Review of the Intensive Shaolin Kungfu Course in Sabah in March 2007

Click here for an Overview of the entire course

  1. The Basics of Shaolin Kungfu Training
  2. Fundamental Combat Skills
  3. Defeat you Hand to your Opponent, Victory you Create Yourself
  4. Avoiding Disadvantages and Seeking Advantages
  5. Basic Principles and Tactics of Combat
  6. Skills derived from Sparring can be Rewardingly used in Daily Life
  7. Some Secrets in Practicing Genuine Kungfu
  8. Various Ways to Move into an Opponent

  9. Applying Combat Sequences in Sparring
  10. Linking Sequences to be More Combat Efficient
  11. The Secrets of Continuous Cannons
  12. The Mechanics of Continuation
  13. Marvelous Techniques Beget Marvelous Techniques
  14. Perfecting Forms and Developing Force
  15. Applying Tactics in Combat
  16. Objectives of Form Training in Solo

  17. Being Fluent in Kicking Techniques before Applying them in Combat
  18. Using Tactics in Kicking Attacks and Defences
  19. Different Levels of Sophistication in Sparring and Fighting
  20. The Legacy of Uncle Righteousness: Secret of Continuous Cannons and their Counters
  21. Benefiting from the Experiences and Teachings of Past Masters

  22. Poetic Patterns Can be Very Deadly
  23. Moving Back One Step when in Diffiuclt Situations
  24. Linking Sequences to Form a Kungfu Set
  25. Felling Techniques in Kungfu are Different from Judo and Wrestling
  26. Butterfly Palms and Hiding Flowers are Excellent in Countering Felling and Gripping Attacks
  27. Let Mercy Flow from the Hands

  28. Benefits of Solo Set Practice — Combat Sequences 13 to 16
  29. From Pre-Choice Sequences to Free Sparring
  30. Applying Shaolin Patterns Correctly and Spontaneously in Free Sparring
  31. Shaolin Kungfu against Boxing and Kick-Boxing
  32. Shaolin Counters against Wrestling Shoots
  33. The Secret of Grandmaster Ho Fatt Nam
  34. Why Shaolin Kungfu is Technically Faster than Boxing
  35. Shaolin Techniques, Tactics and Strategies against Boxing
  36. Revealing Secrets of Past Taijiquan Masters
  37. Overwhelming Opponents with Just One Pattern
  38. Poetry and Elegance in Effective Combat

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